Positive Changes 4 Women, Inc

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Your children are watching February 23, 2016

Filed under: parenting,Uncategorized — Positive Changes 4 Women, Inc @ 8:50 pm
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Quite frequently I will have parents contact me asking me to “fix “their teenage daughter They will then proceed to share with me why they want me to “fix” in their child. She never listens, she is spoiled, she is acting out, she is refusing to do her homework, she is brat, she is a liar, she is ungrateful and inconsiderate etc.

 

I attempt to explain to parents that while I empathize with their frustrations, labeling their child with negative connotations, screaming at them and sometimes trying to control their with behavior with physical actions can all to often lead to more acting out. At some point in their lives, all teenagers will act out, because research shows that they are biologically wired to do so.  However, this is not to say that the teenager has free rein to say and do what she pleases. While teens must learn to take responsibility and accountability for their behavior, parents must also learn to take accountability for their reactions and behavior.  What once worked when they were little is no longer working, yet parents all to often get stuck in a rut and refuse to change even when things are escalating.

So here are some tips to get your relationship back on the right track.

  1. STOP SHOUTING. I know, I know thats the only way she will listen to me. But ask yourself if that is true?  What happens when you start shouting? Does she shout back? Does it escalate? Or does she shut down?  If you truly want a teen to listen, lower your voice.  There really is no reason to shout other than it is a sign that you are losing control of the situation.
  2. You want to be respected, then teach respect.  Respect is not earned by bullying, demanding, shouting, hitting, calling names etc.  How does it feel when your teen calls you names and shouts at you? No one is going to win. it becomes a battle of the egos.
  3. Pay attention to your body.  Teenagers have a knack of finding your insecurities, so pay attention to your body.  If you notice that your heartbeat is increasing, gritting your teeth, sweaty palms. increased breathing etc, this is usually a sign that you have been activated. Take a breath, walk away because if you don’t it is about to get ugly. Remember your the adult
  4. Connect, Connect, Connect.  Connection is the key that can create many positive changes. Spend time getting to know your teen.  Know there will be times she will be silent and doesn’t want to connect.  Thats okay.  Keep trying. Listen to what she has to say. Does she have a point?  Again check in with your body to see if your reacting negatively because she disagrees.
  5. Catch them doing something positive.  I cannot stress this enough. Teenagers are often reminded of ALL the things that they are doing wrong. Imagine for a second how you would feel if your boss reminded you every day of the things that you were doing wrong. But how would it feel to be acknowledged for the things that you are doing right? You would probably be more likely to work harder.  Don’t get me wrong, I am not saying that you can’t correct your teen or guide them to making the right decisions, but also learn to balance it with some positivity or they may look for that acknowledgement in not so favorable places.
  6. Your teenagers are watching.  Thats right just like you are watching their every move they are watching yours.  It is not what you say, its how you say it, it’s what you do.  So if your child is shouting, ask your-self if you shout. If they shut down, ask your-self if you run away from conflict.  They are always watching.  So be mindful!
 

Learning To take Care of My-Self February 4, 2016

Filed under: change,inspiration,Uncategorized — Positive Changes 4 Women, Inc @ 2:53 pm
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I am very blessed to work in the field that I do. They push me out of my comfort zone on a regular basis. These women are my hero’s who have the courage to take back their own lives and do it with such class and passion. It takes a lot of strength to heal and move forward. 

One of the survivors has offered to share a glimpse into her journey of healing……

 

 

The funny thing about being an adult survivor of sexual, emotional and physical abuse is that you don’t see your-self as someone who is strong and powerful. Yet as a child I was fighting everyday of my life to survive. I had to be strong not only physically but also emotionally and mentally. I didn’t think about what was happening. I just did it. I was fearless. I learned to adapt to a plethora of situations or else I would never have survived. I just did what I needed to do to stay alive. I thought outside of the box. In a nutshell I was simply amazing, but I didn’t realize how strong and amazing I was, until much later.

 

So when did I change to someone who hated and despised herself? When did I learn that it was better to align my-self with the abuser then to be free? When did I allow my mind to turn against me?

 

When I think about it, it is astonishing how I learned to become abusive towards my-self. He taught me very well to hate my-self. I no longer needed him to be in person to abuse me. I just did it for my-self and I did it with such ease and simplicity. I was an expert on abuse and I knew instinctively what to do to continue this pain. All I had to do was look in the mirror and just like magic, words of hate and disgust would automatically appear in my mind. I would put my body through daily vigorous workouts to punish it for not looking good enough. Sometimes I would poison my body with a cocktail of drugs and alcohol. I believed it was making me invincible, when instead it was making me weaker. As I allowed his voice to get stronger, my voice of strength was getting weaker. The weaker I got, the stronger he got.

 

I would surround my-self with people who would share the same beliefs of self-hate. I knew this language, I felt safe. Men who were kind and treated me with respect was seen as a threat, so I would label them as weak. I would seek out men who were unattainable, who treated me like shit because it would secretly confirm I was worthless and not worthy to be loved. This is all I knew. My destruction was my validation that I was worthless. Little did I know, I was slowly becoming a prisoner of my own mind, promising my-self that tomorrow would be different. But tomorrow would come and it was no different. I continued the abuse. I was helpless. I was scared of everything and everyone.

 

What happened to that person who survived? What happened to that person who fought everyday of her life? What happened to that strength? Where is that person?

 

I know that person is in there? I know she is scared but I know she is also strong. Most days I would hear this silent whisper, “You got this, I beg you, you deserve better.” I would scream back and shout that I didn’t deserve to be happy or loved.  All you have to do is look at my life. I have a history of broken relationships. Look no one likes me, but all I wanted was to be loved. What was I doing wrong?

 

Maybe, just maybe this other voice might be right. I slowly learned to listen to that other voice. Whose voice is that?  Yes I was scared to trust this voice, but there was something about this voice that kept willing me back.  It sounded familiar.  As I started to tune in I began to recognize this voice. This was the voice that woke me up every morning and helped me survive many years of abuse. This was the voice that kept me alive!!

 

This is my voice. I know that this is my voice and not the abuser, because I am kind, I am supportive and I push my-self to be strong. I tell my-self to go look in that mirror. I hear it immediately, “your ugly, you don’t deserve love, your fat, just lose some weight and then people will love you.” NOOOOOO! I know that voice. It’s not mine. I beg my mind not to listen to that voice, but its so easy. I know that voice. I can predict my day when I give into that voice. Learning to listen to my other voice is scary. This doesn’t feel normal, but I beg my-self to listen that voice. That voice, that kind voice is MINE. I will myself to take another look at my body. This body is MINE. My body is not weak. My body is not to be hated. This body is MINE. I own this body now. I am learning  to take back what was once mine.

 

 

…….Survivor of child sexual abuse and adult rape!